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The Sentro Knitting Machine Review

Updated: Jun 23

It is no secret that I am a huge fan of the Sentro Knitting Machine. Among the non-professional or starter knitting machines, it has been the best that I've had. I first began my journey with this machine in 2019 when I was looking for a more efficient way of churning out donation items.

This machine totally upped my making game as I was able to make considerably more hats and scarves for charity AND I was able to dramatically boost my inventory. If you're a maker trying to start a business, you're probably looking at how time consuming it is to make each item.

Well, with the Sentro, you can crank out a simple hat in about 30 minutes or less. Over the summer of 2020, I sat up in my studio and produced inventory like a Keebler elf. I've lost count of all the hat/scarf sets and long scarves that I churned out.


Likewise, this machine can come in handy for when you start doing craft fairs. This machine is particular when it comes to the yarns you use with it. I've dedicated an entire blog to listing yarns that work with the Sentro Knitting Machine.


The machine also comes in a variety of sizes. The only other brand of circular knitting machine that

offers this benefit is the Addi. The Sentro Knitting Machine comes in 22, 40, and 48 needle sizes. Last summer I invested in the 22 size for making baby projects. What I've discovered since then is that there is an array of project that one can make with this particular size. I also did an overview of the machine on my YouTube channel.



Another big reason for investing in the Sentro is that I wanted to test the waters before purchasing the more expensive professional machines. I'm sure the Addi series is amazing however, when living on a budget, the Sentro is the next best thing. For about $65 dollars you can own a Sentro as opposed to the $300 for one version of the Addi.


When I started making hats with my Sentro, I was selling them at about $10 per hat. This machine in the two years I've had it, has more than doubled what it was worth from hat sales alone.


The moral of the story here is, if you're looking for an affordable way to boost your crafty production, this machine may be your first choice.

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